Hi, I’m Chris Smith and being over 55 myself makes me well aware that we aren’t all quite as quick or strong as we once were. Nevertheless, you’re never too old to improve and I will help you get the most out of your game.


 

senior tennus by chris smithChris Smith has played recreational & competitive tennis since age 11. He lettered in tennis in high school and played for both the University of South Alabama and the University of West Florida. Chris has played in hundreds of tennis tournaments and has competed several times at the USTA national level.

He served on the faculty at the Mississippi Gulf Coast Junior College and University of South Alabama as a Tennis Instructor. Research from his teaching served as the basis for his Master’s thesis “The Effectiveness of Four Instructional Paradigms on Beginning Tennis Instruction”.

After discovering computers and moving to Texas, Chris took a hiatus from tennis and started several technology companies including Saber Software, Statewide Data Services, Advantage Credit International and Advantage Assessment. After selling his business interests in Texas he returned to the panhandle of Florida and began playing tennis seriously again.

Chris Smith ended up buying the Pensacola Racquet Club and completely transformed the outdated facility into the most successful tennis club in the region. He was also invited to coach the University of West Florida’s Women’s Tennis Team and did so for 2 pleasurable years.

After moving to South Florida, Chris built a Har-Tru court in his backyard and played there daily while beginning a fascination with golf. After 10 years of semi-retirement, Chris is a 5 handicap and following in the footsteps of long-time tennis partner, Ian Schneider, in pursuing tennis as a third career.

You will see Chris on weekday mornings when he is filling in for Scott or hitting with friends and family.

Chris is available for lessons by appointment.

You can reach Chris on his cell phone 561.901-5922 or via email chris10ssmith@msn.com

Favorite tips:
Down the middle won’t hurt you.
Keep your weight on your front foot.

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